MAGNESIUM 

Form: Magnesium Hydroxide from seawater

Amount: 215mg, 50% DV

Benefits:

  • Sleep Aid
  • Women’s Health
  • Bone Health

Why Magnesium? 

Magnesium is responsible for several functions in the human body. It is a cofactor for more than 300 enzymatic reactions, which regulate a number of fundamental functions such as muscle contraction, neuromuscular conduction*, glycemic control, normal heart rhythm, blood pressure, and protein synthesis**. Magnesium also plays a vital role in energy production and active transport of ions in the body***. It also aids in bone development and immunological functions (1). Magnesium is a key co-nutrient: a review published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association in 2018 found that Vitamin D can't be metabolized without sufficient magnesium levels (2).

Dietary magnesium intake has been shown to be insufficient in Western populations due to industrial food processing. The recommended daily allowance for magnesium is 420 mg for males and 320 mg for females, but the standard diet in the United States contains only about 50 percent of that amount.

*transmission of electrical impulse from a nerve to the muscle 
**building proteins from amino acids 
***essential for the conduction of nerve impulses in the body 
  1. Al Alawi AM, Majoni SW, Falhammar H. Magnesium and Human Health: Perspectives and Research Directions. Int J Endocrinol. 2018;2018:9041694. Published 2018 Apr 16. doi:10.1155/2018/9041694
  2. American Osteopathic Association. "Low magnesium levels make vitamin D ineffective: Up to 50 percent of US population is magnesium deficient." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 February 2018. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180226122548.htm>.

What are the benefits of Magnesium?

Bone Health:

Bones store around 60% of the body’s total magnesium, and magnesium on the surface of bones is available for exchange with serum magnesium. Serum magnesium has been demonstrated to be associated with low bone density in pre- and post- menopausal women. Magnesium intake is found to be positively correlated with greater bone mineral density. This is true in both men and women (1).

  1. Al Alawi AM, Majoni SW, Falhammar H. Magnesium and Human Health: Perspectives and Research Directions. Int J Endocrinol. 2018;2018:9041694. Published 2018 Apr 16. doi:10.1155/2018/9041694 

 

Women’s Health:

Migraines are one of the most common premenstrual syndrome symptoms among women. Those that suffer from menstrual headaches have shown signs of deficiency in magnesium. A 1991 study of 20 patients affected by menstrual migraines showed a reduced number of days with a headache. This was after two months of magnesium supplementation (360mg/day) (1).

Dietary magnesium supplementation has also been proven to alleviate fluid retention. It also improves mood shifts associated with premenstrual syndrome in women. A double-blind randomized study done on 32 women (ages 24-39) with confirmed PMS. The data indicated decreased negative affect* in the group receiving magnesium treatment (using the Moos Menstrual Distress Questionnaire) (2).

*the experience of negative emotions and poor self-concept
  1. Facchinetti F, Sances G, Borella P, Genazzani AR, Nappi G. Magnesium prophylaxis of menstrual migraine: effects on intracellular magnesium. Headache. 1991;31(5):298‐301. doi:10.1111/j.1526-4610.1991.hed3105298.x
  2. Facchinetti F, Borella P, Sances G, Fioroni L, Nappi RE, Genazzani AR. Oral magnesium successfully relieves premenstrual mood changes. Obstet Gynecol. 1991;78(2):177‐181.

Sleep:

Insomnia can affect all ages, but tends to get worse as we age. Nearly 50% of older adults experience insomnia. Insomnia can lead to daytime sleepiness, irritability, depression and anxiety. It can even lead to declines in cognitive function. A 2001 study published in Behaviour Genetics concluded that optimal magnesium intake is necessary for normal sleep regulation (1).

A separate 2012 clinical study was performed with elderly adult participants. Each participant was given 500 mg of magnesium over the course of 8 weeks. The study found improvements in sleep efficiency, concentration of serum renin, cortisol and melatonin, compared to those given a placebo (2).

  1. Chollett D, Franken P et al. Magnesium involvement in sleep: genetic and nutritional models. Behav Genet 2001 Sep; 31(5):413-25
  2. Abbasi B, Kimiagar M, Sadeghniiat K, Shirazi MM, Hedayati M, Rashidkhani B. The effect of magnesium supplementation on primary insomnia in elderly: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. Journal of research in medical sciences: the official journal of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, 2012

When should I take Magnesium?

Contrary to some sources, it shouldn’t matter what time of day you take Magnesium, as long as you take it with food. Lucky for you GEM is made of food!

How long does it take to feel the benefits of Magnesium?

It can take awhile to feel the benefits of magnesium supplementation, depending on where you’re starting from. If you’re severely deficient, it’s possible to see benefits in as little as a week. More likely, however, it will take weeks or months of consistent use. One study found noticeable improvement in depressive symptoms in as little as two weeks.(1) Another study found improvement in sleep in about 8 weeks.(2)

  1. Tarleton EK, Littenberg B, MacLean CD, Kennedy AG, Daley C. Role of magnesium supplementation in the treatment of depression: A randomized clinical trial. PLoS One. 2017;12(6):e0180067. Published 2017 Jun 27. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0180067
  2. Abbasi B, Kimiagar M, Sadeghniiat K, Shirazi MM, Hedayati M, Rashidkhani B. The effect of magnesium supplementation on primary insomnia in elderly: A double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. J Res Med Sci. 2012;17(12):1161‐1169.

Our Source

Our Magnesium Hydroxide is sourced naturally from sea minerals. They contain 72 additional trace minerals derived from the clean waters off the Irish coast. A study was conducted to examine the bioavailability of our magnesium. Ours was compared to Magnesium Chloride and Magnesium Oxide using the Caco-2 cell model*. The data suggested that our magnesium hydroxide derived from sea minerals is bioaccessible and bioavailable to a significantly greater degree than MgO. This is while displaying a similar profile to MgCl2 (1). Nonetheless, this is worthy to suggest that our supplier provides a superior source to other traditional commercial forms.

*an in vitro model widely used to study mineral bioavailability from different sources
  1. Felice VD, O'Gorman DM, O'Brien NM, Hyland NP. Bioaccessibility and Bioavailability of a Marine-Derived Multimineral, Aquamin-Magnesium. Nutrients. 2018;10(7):912. Published 2018 Jul 17. doi:10.3390/nu10070912